How To Play Lead Guitar

The lead guitar player in a band is the guy who plays the solos. They may be extended instrumental breaks in a song or just licks interspersed with the vocals. Many guitar students, after becoming competent in playing chords, feel that learning to play lead is the next step. This feeling is often inspired by [...]

Related posts:

  1. How To Play Guitar Scales It would not be fair to talk about how to…
  2. How To Play Lead Guitar If you have seen guitar groups and have often wondered…
  3. How To Solo With The Minor Pentatonic Scale The two pentatonic scales we use in guitar solos are…

Source: Guitar How-To

Posted in Electric Guitar News | Tagged as: , , | Leave a comment

Buying A Bass Guitar – How to Buy Your First Bass Guitar on a Budget

Buying a bass guitar is an exciting time. A world of possibilities playing bass guitar is opening up before your eyes. The scent of new experiences and realized dreams is in the air, so a little discipline is called for. So have you set your price range? You might be looking at somewhere between two [...]

Related posts:

  1. Bass Guitar Fret Buzz And How To Fix It So your bass guitar has fret buzz and you do…
  2. How To Play Bass Guitar Today I want to talk about how to play bass…
  3. How to Buy a Good Electric Guitar If you have been playing acoustic guitar for a while,…

Source: Guitar How-To

Posted in Electric Guitar News | Tagged as: , , | 2 Comments

How To Play Guitar – A Guide For Beginners

The majority of beginner guitar players want to become virtuosos quickly. The desire for rapid progress can often be a hindrance to attaining real techincal abilility on the guitar. A lot of the advice consists of one word – practice. When it comes to learning to play guitar for beginners, practice is the big challenge. [...]

Related posts:

  1. How To Find The Best Lessons For The Guitar Beginner Launching your career as a guitar beginner is pretty exciting…
  2. How to Play Acoustic Guitar for Beginners Many people want to learn how to play the acoustic…
  3. How To Play The Guitar Free There are many guitar lessons online for free, but where…

Source: Guitar How-To

Posted in Electric Guitar News | Tagged as: , , | 1 Comment

How To Do Guitar Stretches

Maybe you have been learning how to play guitar but it’s painful to stretch your fingers and place them on the fretboard with enough weight to produce a clean sound. This does not mean there is something wrong with your hands or your approach to playing. It’s just that your hand needs practice in order [...]

Related posts:

  1. Finger Picking Lesson – How To Play An Arpeggio On The Guitar Arpeggios are often a challenge for guitar players who are…
  2. How To Use Your Thumb To Fret Guitar Chords Using the thumb to actually do the work of fretting…
  3. How To Tune Guitars This article is about how to tune guitars. Although newcomers…

Source: Guitar How-To

Posted in Electric Guitar News | Tagged as: , , | Leave a comment

How to play Heart of the country

HOW TO PLAY, ACOUSTIC GUITAR – HEART OF THE COUNTRY – PAUL McCARTNEY POR ADILSON SIRABELLO BANDAS : PRIMAVERA DE PRAGA & BEACH BOYS COVER

Source: YouTube

Posted in Acoustic Guitar Tutorials | Tagged as: , , | Leave a comment

How to play the acoustic guitar, acoustic guitar video less

Learn How to Play Acoustic Guitar For Beginners Visit livetojam.com and you will find Acoustic Guitar Lessons Video you needed. Learn how to play guitar check here.

Source: YouTube

Posted in Acoustic Guitar Tutorials | Tagged as: , , | Leave a comment

Adopt Video Guitar Lessons To Learn Playing Guitar Quickly

Guitar lesson DVD’s are a great way of learning to play guitar. It provides an interactive way of learning the art of playing guitar. Learning to play guitar through guitar lesson videos also helps in learning this art quickly. Video guitar lessons have been a treasured secret of mastering the musical art of playing guitar professionally. Several prominent professional guitarists have adopted it to hone their guitar playing skills or to overcome their weaknesses. Guitar Lesson Video – Fun and Easy Way of Learning Guitar Music Learning to play guitar using guitar lesson videos is fun and comparatively an easier way than other traditional modes of learning guitar. Guitar lesson DVD’s present the guitar lessons in attractive and easily understandable manner making it easy to grasp the instructions given by the professional guitarists in the video. Apart from that watching your favorite professional guitarists in video is an awesome experience. It provides inspiration as well as motivation towards this musical art of playing guitar. Learning by watching actions of handling guitar and chords is easier than remembering the moves suggested by a guitar instructor in regular guitar lessons. Why Guitar Video Lessons Are Different?
Going for regular guitar lessons from a guitar instructor in your city or neighborhood becomes a routine and its human tendency to feel boredom from following same routine again and again. After sometime the passion of learning guitar turns into just another task and people lose their interest. However with guitar lesson DVD’s, enthusiastic guitar players of future can learn the secret tactics of playing guitar as their preferred time during day or night (or any other time when they are free and in mood of learning guitar). Guitar lesson videos also provide the facility of isolation, like regular guitar lessons you will not be a part of crowd where the instructor has to take care of everything. Guitar lesson DVD’s are developed according to one-on-one interaction in mind. Aspiring guitar players learning to play guitar through a DVD guitar lesson feel that the instructor in video is talking to him only. It provides more focused and concentrated approach for learning. Keeping all the aforementioned benefits and cost effectiveness of guitar video lesson in mind, people should adopt this unique and effective way of learning guitar music. It is really fun and like a piece of cake to be the master in art of playing guitar using guitar video lessons.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/music-articles/adopt-video-guitar-lessons-to-learn-playing-guitar-quickly-2009959.html

About the Author
At LearnGuitarFast.com people can get different DVD’s of guitar lessons, based on different musical genres as well as difficulty level. For more information about different Guitar Lessons DVD as well as their pricing one. For more information please visit: Playing Guitar Quickly

Posted in How To Play Guitar | Tagged as: , , | Leave a comment

Are You Ready To Play Guitar

Are you aggravated while working to study the guitar?

You can search through all kinds of cost-free guitar tabs and online guitar lessons and come across lots of bits and pieces of details to throw away your free time and understand almost nothing. Acquire all the guitar tabs you want. Save the free videos to your computer. A year from now you will have a pack of stored tab and videos and you’ll nevertheless be playing like a newbie. Believe me, I know simply because I’ve done exactly that in the past and didn’t get anywhere either. What I was in need of and what you need to have is definitely an Organized system to learn to play guitar.

Are you Completely ready to play the guitar?

Don’t even take the trouble unless you’re prepared. What do I mean by that? When my son was a kid he claimed he wanted to learn guitar. I sat down with him and taught him some chords and notes and stuff, but he didn’t learn or even practice noticeably. He claimed he didn’t wish to learn from dad. I could understand that. So I paid out some cash for an instructor and my son still spent much more time enjoying video games than he did playing the guitar.

He wasn’t totally ready to take pleasure in his guitar. When you’re set, you will play it because you want to. You’ll enjoy whatever you know mainly because you’d rather be playing the guitar than doing something else. Do you believe anybody ever had to coerce Doc Watson to sit down and practice an hour a day?

Now my son is twenty-two and he’s been actively playing, definitely actively playing, for a couple of years and he’s very great. When he was ready, he played guitar because he wanted to play.

Do you definitely want the finest online guitar lessons available?

In the event you aren’t following an organized system of mastering the guitar, you’ll be wasting quite a lot of your time! But the great news is you’re about to learn how to enjoy guitar quicker and far better. As soon as you find out the secret, you will stop wasting time searching for guitar tab that makes sense and commence enjoying the guitar!

The Ideal Online Guitar Classes!

There are plenty of downloadable internet guitar lessons offered. Some have twenty-five or so beginner videos and a workbook. Some will give you twelve months or six months or eight months worth of classes. You’ll find they are all limited in range except GUITAR Tricks. Only GUITAR Tricks is definitely an on-going program to help you go from where you are at present to where you want to go with a massive selection of over 3000 streaming videos and tutorials that take you through each and every step of the guitar learning process.

GUITAR Tricks is a lot more than lessons and tutorials; it is a community. Meet up with 1000′s of like-minded guitarists in the forums. With over 200,000 posts, 22,000 threads, and special Full Access Subscriber sections, the Guitar Tricks Forums are a lively extension to your guitar instruction process.

GUITAR Tricks has 45 instructors. Your teachers are industry professionals experienced at showing beginner, intermediate, and sophisticated guitarists just about every trick of the trade.

Only GUITAR Tricks provides you Jam Station. Jam Station is just like having a backing band at your all set to assist you jam 24 / 7 night or day. You will find over 150 tracks in the Jam Station and much more on the way.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/music-articles/are-you-ready-to-play-guitar-1880744.html

About the Author

Learn how to get 24 free introductory lessons from Guitar Tricks at Today’s Guitar. That’s more free lessons than you would get if you paid for most DVD based guitar courses.

Posted in How To Play Guitar | Tagged as: , , | 1 Comment

How To Play Guitar Chords

Knowing How to Play Guitar Chords is one of the most important things for beginning players to learn. Not only are they important tools for developing your finger strength and dexterity, they also provide a foundation for learning, reading and playing songs. This page will show you how (with written instructions and diagrams) to play some of the most common guitar chords.

As a guitar player, chords are your bread and butter. They form the basis of almost every song and are the building blocks for most of the things that you will learn on the guitar. If you don’t already know, a chord is a combination of at least two notes that are played simultaneously, creating a fuller, richer sound than can be achieved by playing each note individually. While most chords involve at least three notes played simultaneously, some may use even more. Also, chords usually involve playing multiple strings at the same time, which is called strumming. For more information on the basics of guitar playing, see Mahalo’s guide to How to Play Guitar. On this page we will look at three of the most widely used chord “Families”: Major Chords, Minor Chords and Seventh Chords. We will go over the finger positions for each of the chords (along with helpful diagrams) and explain a little bit about what makes each chord unique. Let’s get started.

What You’ll Need to Know

Before we jump right in to how to play each chord, let’s briefly go over some of the basic things that you will need to know in order to use the information below.

Strings

* A normal guitar has six strings, each of which has a different size and note value. In standard tuning, the bottom string (also the skinniest and highest sounding) is an E note. This is also known as the 1st string. The 2nd string up (a little bit thicker and lower sounding) is a B note. The 3rd string up is a G note, 4th is a D, 5th is an A, and the 6th string (thickest, lowest sounding, and closest to your body) is also an E note. When in tune, playing the 1st and the 6th strings open should produce the same note, albeit at different pitches. Mnemonic devices can help you remember the order of the strings: For example, from top to bottom: Eat All Day Get Big Easy. Or come up with your own.

Frets

While the strings divide the guitar from left to right (as in the diagram), frets are small metal strips that divide the guitar into sections from top to bottom. If you look at your guitar from above, you can begin to see that the strings and frets together form a kind of grid that covers the entire neck of the guitar. Placing your finger on a string in between two of the frets is what enables you to play a note. The higher up you get on the frets, the higher the notes sound. In general, each fret is a half-step higher than the previous fret.

Fingers

* In the same way that we numbered each of the strings, we will also assign a number value to each of the fingers on your fretting hand so that you know which fingers to use when creating a chord. When reading the diagrams below:
o 1 = Index finger
o 2 = Middle finger
o 3 = Ring finger
o 4 = Pinky finger
o 0 = Play the note Open
o X = Don’t play the string

* Now we’re ready to go!

MAJOR CHORDS

* The most common chords found in Western music are the “Major” chords. Major chords are characterized by their bright, upbeat sounding quality. These are the ones that beginning guitar players usually learn first. Each of these chords is made up of a diffe

A Major

1. Place your index finger on the 4th string, 2nd fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 3rd string, 2nd fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 2nd string, 2nd fret
4. Start from the 5th string and strum each of the strings below in quick succession. Do not play the 6th string.

* The A Major chord is a little bit more difficult than the C Major, due to the fact that all three of your fingers are scrunched together closely on the 2nd fret. Try playing this chord a few times to see how it feels and sounds. If you are still having problems, or your fingers are so big that they just don’t all fit on the 2nd fret at the same time, you may want to experiment with other fingerings. One way to remove the need for the ring finger is to use your middle finger to hold down both the 3rd and 2nd strings at the same time.

B Major

1. Place your index finger on the 1st string, 2nd fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 4th string, 4th fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 3rd string, 4th fret
4. Place your pinky finger on the 2nd string, 4th fret
5. Start from the 4th string and strum each of the strings below in quick succession. Do not play the 6th or 5th strings.

* The B Major chord is often one of the most difficult for beginners to learn due to the fact that you must use all four of your available fingers and because you are using the 4th fret for the first time. Don’t worry. The more you practice this chord, the easier it will be for your fingers to remember the shape they should be in.

C Major

1. Place your ring finger on the 5th string, 3rd fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 4th string, 2nd fret
3. Place your index finger on the 2nd string, 1st fret
4. Start from the 5th string and strum each of the strings below it in quick succession. Do not play the 6th string.

* The C Major chord that you have just made should look a little bit like a staircase, with your index finger forming the lowest step. It may seem awkward at first to keep your fingers in that position, but don’t worry. The more you practice each chord, and the stronger your fingers become, the easier it will be for your hand to form the chord structures. It’s alright if it didn’t sound perfect or if some of the notes didn’t ring true. That will come with practice.

D Major

1. Place your index finger on the 3rd string, 2nd fret
2. Place your ring finger on the 2nd string, 3rd fret
3. Place your middle finger on the 1st string, 2nd fret
4. Start from the 4th string and play each of the strings below in quick succession. Do not play either the 5th or 6th strings.

* Of all of the major chords, the D Major chord is often the most difficult for beginners and the toughest to make each of the notes ring true. But have no fear. As with all of the lessons you will learn on the guitar, the more you do it, the easier it becomes and the better it sounds!

E Major

1. Place your middle finger on the 5th string, 2nd fret
2. Place your ring finger on the 4th string, 2nd fret
3. Place your index finger on the 3rd string, 1st fret
4. Strum all of the strings in quick succession

* The E Major chord is one of the most recognizable of the “Major” chords, as it can be found in many of the most popular blues and rock songs. Again, don’t worry if some of the notes don’t ring true, or if it sounds at all muffled. With enough practice, your fingers will be able to hold down only the necessary notes on the right strings, while allowing the others to be played “Open.”

F Major

1. Place your index finger so that it covers both the 2nd and 1st strings on the first fret.
2. Place your middle finger on the 3rd string, 2nd fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 4th string, 3rd fret
4. Start from the 4th string and strum each of the strings below in quick succession. Do not play the 6th or 5th strings.

* The F Major chord is similar in shape to the C Major chord in that it looks much like a staircase, expect for the fact that most of the notes in the F Major chord are moved down one string. Besides the similarity of their shapes, the F and C chords are relatively easy to move between and can be found together in many different musical patterns.

G Major

1. Place your middle finger on the 6th string, 3rd fret
2. Place your index finger on the 5th string, 2nd fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 1st string, 3rd fret
4. Strum all of the strings in quick succession

* The G Major chord can be played with a few different fingerings, although the one described above is the easiest for beginning players. An alternate fingering would be to use your ring finger to play the first note, your middle finger to play the second, and your pinkie to play the final note.

MINOR CHORDS

* In contrast to Major chords, Minor chords usually have a darker, moody sound to them. While they are relatively similar in terms of theory (a Minor chord is just a Major chord with a Minor 3rd – rather than a Major 3rd), the sounds that they produce are drastically different and can alter the mood of the song they appear in. Here is how to play the Minor chord versions of the 7 “Natural” notes that we covered in the previous lesson.
A Minor

1. Place your index finger on the 2nd string, 1st fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 4th string, 2nd fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 3rd string, 2nd fret
4. Start from the 5th string and strum all of the strings in quick succession. Do not play the 6th string.

* The A Minor chord is similar to the A Major chord (as you can see), although many people think that it is easier to play (due to the fact that you don’ have to squeeze all of your fingers onto one fret. Practice moving back and forth between the Major and Minor versions of the A Chord.

B Minor

1. Place your index finger on the 1st string, 2nd fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 2nd string, 3rd fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 4th string, 4th fret
4. Place your pinky finger on the 3rd string, 4th fret
5. Start on the 4th string and strum each of the strings below in quick succession. Do not play either the 6th or 5th strings.

* The B Minor chord is one that is often difficult to get at first (probably because you have to use all four of your fretting fingers – including your pinky). Don’t worry if you have trouble making this chord at first. Just remember that it has a similar staircase shape to the C Major and F Major chords.

C Minor

1. Place your index finger on the 5th string, 2nd fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 2nd string, 3rd fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 4th string, 4th fret
4. Place your pinky finger on the 3rd string, 4th fret
5. Start on the 5th string and strum all of the chords below (besides the 1st string)

* The C Minor chord is another tough one, as it requires your fingers to stretch more than they have so far. Make sure to stretch out your fingers before trying this one.
D Minor Chord

D Minor

1. Place your index finger on the 1st string, 1st fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 3rd string, 2nd fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 2nd string, 3rd fret
4. Start from the 4th string and strum each of the strings below in quick succession. Do not play either the 6th or 5th strings.

* The D Minor chord is one that many guitar players have trouble wrapping their heads around (maybe because it inverts the sharp of the D Major chord). Spend some time with this one until you play it well.
E Minor

1. Place your middle finger on the 5th string, 2nd fret
2. Place your ring finger on the 4th string, 2nd fret
3. Start on the 6th string and play all of the strings below in quick succession.
4. Be sure to play All of the strings on this one.

* The E Minor chord is a very popular chord and is used in many different situations. Luckily, it is also a relatively easy chord to learn and master. It is also really easy to move back and forth between the Major and Minor chord versions of E (as the E minor is simply an E Major without the index finger.

F Minor

1. Place your index finger flat so that it covers the 1st, 2nd and 3rd strings on the 1st fret.
2. Place your ring finger on the 4th string, 3rd fret
3. Start at the 4th string and play each of the strings below in quick succession.
4. Do not play either the 6th or the 5th strings

* The F Minor chord can be tough if you haven’t built up your finger strength yet. Just keeping all of the strings fretted with your index finger can be difficult at first. Try starting with just your index finger and then add your ring finger when you are comfortable holding down all three notes.

G Minor

1. Place your index finger flat so that it covers the 1st, 2nd and 3rd strings on the 3rd fret
2. Place your ring finger on 5th string, 5th fret
3. Place your pinky finger on the 4th string, 5th fret
4. Start at the 5th string and play all of the strings below in quick succession
5. Do not play the 6th string

* The G Minor chord is similar to the F Minor chord in that it requires your index finger to hold down three strings at once, but it can be even more difficult because it also requires your ring and pinky to hold down notes to. Take note: The diagram above doesn’t include the first 2 frets (as the chord starts on the 3rd).

SEVENTH CHORDS

* A Seventh chord is a regular chord with an added seventh note above the root. Seventh Chords are often used in Jazz and Blues forms due to their ability to bridge the gap (or suggest movement) between one chord and another. Any type of chord can be turned into a Seventh chord by simply adding a seventh note above the root. Here we will look at the Major and Minor variations of the seventh chord.

A Major 7th

1. Place your index finger on the 3rd string, 1st fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 4th string, 2nd fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 2nd string, 2nd fret
4. Strum all of the strings except the 6th.

A Minor 7th

1. Place your index finger on the 2nd string, 1st fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 4th string, 2nd fret
3. Strum all of the strings except the 6th

B Major 7th

1. Place your index finger on the 5th string, 2nd fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 3rd string, 3rd fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 4th string, 4th fret
4. Place your pinky finger on the 2nd string, 4th fret
5. Strum all the strings except the 6th and 1st

B Minor 7th

1. Place your index finger flat so that it covers strings 5 through 1 on the 2nd fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 2nd string, 3rd fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 4th string, 4th fret
4. Strum all of the strings except the 6th

C Major 7th

1. Place your index finger on the 5th string, 3rd fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 3rd string, 4th fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 4th string, 5th fret
4. Place your pinky finger on the 2nd string, 5th fret
5. Strum all the strings except the 6th and 1st

C Minor 7th

1. Place your index finger flat so that it covers strings 5 through 1 on the 3rd fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 2nd string, 4th fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 4th string, 5th fret
4. Strum all of the strings except the 6th

D Major 7th

1. Place your index finger flat so that is covers the 3rd, 2nd and 1st strings on the 2nd fret
2. Start on the 4th string and strum each of the strings below in quick succession.
3. Do not play either the 6th or 5th strings.

D Minor 7th

1. Place your index finger flat so that it covers the 1st and 2nd strings on the 1st fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 3rd string, 2nd fret
3. Start on the 4th string and strum each of the strings below in quick succession.
4. Do not play either the 6th or 5th strings

1. Place your index finger on the 4th string, 1st fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 3rd string, 1st fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 5th string, 2nd fret
4. Play all of the strings in quick succession

E Minor 7th

1. Place your middle finger on the 5th string, 2nd fret
2. Play all of the strings in quick succession.

F Major 7th

1. Place your index finger on the 6th string, 1st fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 2nd string, 1st fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 4th string, 2nd fret
4. Place your pinky finger on the 3rd string, 2nd fret
5. Strum all of the strings except the 5th and 1st

F Minor 7th

1. Place your index finger on the 6th string, 1st fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 4th string, 1st fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 3rd string, 1st fret
4. Strum the 6th, 4th and 3rd strings

G Major 7th

1. Place your index finger on the 6th string, 3rd fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 2nd string, 3rd fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 4th string, 4th fret
4. Place your pinky finger on the 3rd string, 4th fret
5. Strum all of the strings except the 5th and 1st

G Minor 7th

1. Place your index finger on the 6th string, 3rd fret
2. Place your middle finger on the 4th string, 3rd fret
3. Place your ring finger on the 3rd string, 3rd fret
4. Strum the 6th, 4th and 3rd strings

Practice Lessons

* As you’ve probably guessed, knowing how to play each chord is only half of the battle. You also need to be able to play each of them confidently and cleanly. The only way to do this is by continued practice and repetition. Here are some brief tips on how to start practicing theses chords:

1. Spend at least 15 minutes practicing each chord until you move on to the next one. Make sure that you can play each one cleanly and without looking at the chord diagram, as this will make it much easier when you begin to learn songs.
2. While playing each chord, start by strumming slowly at first (one string at a time), as this will allow you to see if all of the notes are being played clearly.
3. Once you are comfortable making each of the chord shapes, start trying to move your fingers from one chord to another as quickly and accurately as possible. This may seem hard, and will probably necessitate long pauses in between each switch at first. But the more you do this, the less time it will take you to change chord shapes and the easier it will be when we eventually start to play actual songs.

Conclusion

* Whether you are a beginning guitar player or a seasoned veteran, chords are always going to be a large part of your repertoire, which is why knowing how to play them is so important.
And while you may have trouble getting your fingers into some of these positions at first, the more you practice, the stronger your fingers will become and the easier it will get for you to make some of the more difficult chord shapes. So take the time to master each of these chords before you move on to the next one. Trust me, you will be glad you did!

More info and Free Guiter Lessons here: http://tinyurl.com/yfbq9ub

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/music-articles/how-to-play-guitar-chords-2085632.html

About the Author

The UK Shopping Index for online home shopping, easy access to many of the best online shopping websites for UK consumers.

Every Listing is individually checked, so you can be confident that your shopping experience will be good, don’t get lost in search results. British Listing cuts through all that and quickly gets you to the leading suppliers of all types of retail goods and services.

Visit us for more info at http://www.britishlisting.co.uk

Posted in How To Play Guitar | Tagged as: , , | Leave a comment

Online Guitar Lessons- Can I Learn To Play Guitar For Free

 Peoples schedules are more hectic than they’ve ever been before.  Learning to play guitar or any other musical instrument often takes a back seat to work schedules, family life, childrens afterschool activities and so on.  In fact for many people learning the guitar online is their only option.  If you’re one of these people the good news is your only option to learn the guitar has options.

   
There are two categories of online guitar courses: paid online guitar courses and free online guitar courses.  If you’re wondering why I’ve even mentioned paid guitar courses when there are free courses availible, always remember you get what you pay for. 

  
I don’t say that to discredit a person who puts out a free video to help someone through the kindness of their heart,  but think of it this way:  If you get something for free and it doesn’t work correctly, do you complain to the person who was nice enough to give it to you for nothing in the first place? 

Most of us would take it with a grain of salt and move on realizing that we didn’t invest anything, therefore nothing was lost.  This is dangerous thought process when learning to play guitar. 

 

FREE ONLINE GUITAR LESSONS

  
Unfortunately some of the people who put out the free videos aren’t qualified to do so.  They might even be a great guitar player, but not such a great teacher.  That’s why the lessons are free and theres nothing wrong with that.  What you need to realize is that these are just to give you a very brief sample of guitar playing. 

 

 By nature these courses aren’t meant to teach you all the ins and outs of guitar playing.  If they did put all the work into making a great guitar course I’m sure they would charge a fair price for the work they put into the product.  To clarify, these lessons are not intended to teach you everything about the guitar, just the very basics.

 
  If you just want to learn some guitar basics and that’s it, by all means check out the free online courses.  Some aspiring guitar players just want to play around with a guitar for fun.  Most people out there do offer a great deal of knowledge for beginners free of charge. 

 

 However, if you’d like to eventually be an advanced guitar player, some of the free lessons could hinder your progress as a musician.  Even with the best free lessons available, you will need better guitar lessons to get beyond the basics of playing the guitar.

 
  Lets say you start out on any given free online guitar lessons today.  You will likely complete the first four lessons before dusk.  Usually four or five lessons is the most offered for free and they are typically ten minutes or less. 

 

  After these initial lessons you will either subscribe to pay for more lessons or simply move on to the next set of free lessons.  The next lessons will offer you almost the exact same information as your first lessons with the same end result.  You subscribe to their paid lessons or move on to more free guitar lessons. 

 

  This is a vicious cycle that will surely have you spinning your wheels without actually moving forward.  Going to a dozen different courses to learn the same amount of information is a waste of time and resources.  The key to being a good guitar player is to constantly learn new techniques and implement them. 

 
PAID ONLINE GUITAR LESSONS

   
  Paid online courses cost anywhere from $40-$100+ depending on what you’re looking for.  That’s typically a one time fee, but could be a recurring monthly bill.  These range from courses that are strictly for beginners (a person with absolutely no guitar experience) all the way up to advanced and everywhere in between. 

 

  Depending on what style of guitar the course teaches you, electric, acoustic,classical,etc.., how long the course is and what end result your looking for (beginner,intermediate or advanced) and what kind of videos and bonuses are included all have an outcome on the price. 

 

Why Free Courses Will Never Be As Good

   
  When someone pays to put a product on the market to sell there’s a lot of research involved.  A big part of the research of courses or study materials is being user friendly and a solid curriculum.  The problem I find with free online guitat lessons is that the person doing the video has all the best intentions in the world, and probably is very good at playing the guitar, but most of them just aren’t very good teachers. 

 

  You can’t complain because after all, its free!  however, someone who’s a beginner taking the free course in the hopes he’ll be the next guitar virtuoso doesn’t realize is that those courses may actually be damaging his ability to play.  Most free courses have gaps in the content that often leave you more confused than satisfied.  Avoid added frustrations whenever possible.

  
  Your online guitar goals should be considered to make a conscientious decision on whether to check out some free guitar courses or shop around and get a good paid course.  If you’re not really serious about the guitar and just want to strum around in your free time I would highly recommend checking out the free courses. 

 

  If you just want to play for fun try learning tabs.   Tabs guitar will get you playing quickly.  If you have any long term goals I would suggest getting a good paid course as not to damage what musical skill you have.  Spinning your wheels and getting no where may save money, but you won’t be doing yourself any favors.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/music-articles/online-guitar-lessons-can-i-learn-to-play-guitar-for-free-2120443.html

About the Author

Don’t Be a Statistic!

Out of all the brand new guitar students, 65% will quit before their third month of lessons.  Why?  Guitar lessons that were ineffective, boring and just plain didn’t work for that person. 

Find the Best online guitar lessons in this guitar lessons review.  Check Soon for discounts and bonuses of awesome guitar courses.

Posted in How To Play Guitar | Tagged as: , , | 4 Comments